Achievements

To see project locations, click on Map of Projects and Programs

Williams Accessibility Fund

Sierra Arts Initiative

Wildling Art Exhibition

Tokopah Falls Trail

Jobs for Trails

Giant Sequoia Synthesis

Artists in the Back Country

Beetle Rock Education Center and Sequoia Field Institute

Family Nature Center Program at Beetle Rock Education Center

Photographic Documentation of New Species in the Parks

Fire Education on the Move: “The Fire Place”

Bear Awareness Videos and Exhibits

H.E. Roberts Photo Collection

Kings Canyon Visitor Center Discovery Room Hands-On Activity Stations


Williams Accessibility Fund
In Kings Canyon’s Cedar Grove, a combined effort led to improved access to the Zumwalt Meadow Trail. The Gale Williams Accessibility Fund raised $20,000 that, combined with federal funding, realigned the trail and extended the boardwalk in 2008. Building on that, the Jeangerard Family Foundation donated $13,000 to level and resurface the trail, opening the entire loop to wheelchairs. Photo: SPF Tya Ward, Gale and Dorothy Williams.
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Sierra Arts Initiative

The partnership between the Sequoia Parks Foundation and the fine arts community seeks to develop new ways of communicating the value of the parks to the public. Through these programs the Foundation hopes to facilitate the creation of new bodies of art based on park landscapes and features, encourage artists to involve themselves in wilderness, and assist both artists and the public in rediscovering the High Sierra. The Sequoia Arts Initiative embraces the breadth of artistic expression, including not only painting but also photography, writing, audio recordings, and digital media.

Wildling Art Exhibit
Held at the Wildling Art Museum in Los Olivos central California, At Altitude: Four Views of the Southern Sierra. featured the photography of Jeff Jones, the woodcut prints of Tom Killion, the plein air paintings of Zenaida Mott, and the lithographaphy of Matthew Rangel.

Tokopah Falls Trail
The 40-year old Tokopah Falls Trail is one of Sequoia National Park’s best known and most highly used trails. From its trailhead near Lodgepole campground, to its winding journey through a glacially carved canyon, to its endpoint at a classic waterfall, the trail remains a beloved Southern Sierra destination. Now, thanks to one family, thousands more will enjoy the restored Tokopah Falls Trail for years to come. Through his family foundation, Jack Jeangerard matched $100,000 in park funding, allowing the park to fully realize this $200,000 restoration project.
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Jobs for Trails
With a generous gift of $82,000 from The Jeangerard Family Foundation, “Jobs for Trails” will restore the Bubbs Creek, Copper Creek and Hotel-Lewis Loop Trails-heavily-used, front-country trails found in Kings Canyon. Employing trailcrew members from the California Conservation Corps, this project supports education and career development opportunities for young men and women. When completed, the three trails will provide more enjoyable, safe trail conditions for numerous day hikers, backpackers beginning and completing multi-day trips, and horse and stock users.  Jack Jeangerard on horseback.Woods and Bubbs Creek Trail sign

Giant Sequoia Synthesis
A new grant from Save the Redwood League is supporting a review of the state of knowledge on giant sequoia and is supporting the NPS’ effort to improve management of the species. The project will include a literature review, interviews with key giant sequoia researchers, and convene key individuals for a “round-table” on giant sequoia.

Goals of this project include identifying significant unpublished data, discussing possible threats to the species, including global warming, and compiling a comprehensive list of information gaps important to future decision making regarding the management of giant sequoia. The project is driven by the NPS’ recognition of their role in preserving the species. This concern is shared by all public and private entities who regard giant sequoias as an iconic and inspiring symbol of not only the Sierra Nevada, but also of nature itself.

Artists in the Back Country
Each summer the Sequoia Parks Foundation hosts a group of artists at a week-long campout in the parks. The purpose of this program is to inspire the artists to create work based on Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks and encourage collaboration with Park Service staff towards the protection and support of these parks. With so much of the parks’ high country beyond the reach of the general public, the Foundation also supports excursions for artists into the back country of the high Sierra to create new artwork and document these travels for future use. Photo: ABC 2009 Artists: Bill Cone, Richard Lindenberg, David Robertson, Paul Kratter, Christin Coy, Jeff Horn, Bill Keener, Robert Watters.

Beetle Rock Education Center and Sequoia Field Institute
This project raised funds for the rehabilitation of an existing historic park building in the Giant Forest area for use as an education center. The project also provided funding for the Sequoia Field Institute, an education program that offers a wide range of educational seminars in the parks. Today, the Beetle Rock Education Center and the Sequoia Field Institute are operated by the Sequoia Natural History Association, a major Foundation partner.

Family Nature Center Program at Beetle Rock Education Center
Building on past successes at the Beetle Rock Education Center, Sequoia Parks Foundation provided critical startup funds for a new family nature program at the center. Nearly 10,000 persons enjoyed this program during its first summer of operation.

Photographic Documentation of New Species in the Parks
In a partnership project with National Geographic Magazine, David Liittschwager, a well known photographer who has published books on endangered species, worked closely with researchers and park personnel to document 27 new species in Park caves. The result is a tremendous display of unique and elusive critters not seen by most Park visitors. The project will culminated in an article in the September 2007 issue of National Geographic Magazine. This project was also featured in a cover story of Sierra Magazine.

Fire Education on the Move: “The Fire Place”
Using funds provided by the Foundation, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks have created a mobile interpretive center that provides accurate and balanced information about the complex world of fire ecology and management. The flexibility of this mobile unit allows for use at various locations such as fire incidents, visitor centers, schools and special events. Thousands enjoy this service each year.

Bear Awareness Videos and Exhibits
Protecting black bears has long been a major focus at Sequoia and Kings Canyon. In support of this goal, Sequoia Parks Foundation commissioned a twenty-minute-long video now being used in visitor centers and elsewhere to promote awareness of bears and what we need to do to live with them. This video won the National Association for Interpretation Media Award in 2007!

H.E. Roberts Photo Collection
Responding to an unexpected opportunity, the Foundation stepped forward to purchase a collection of archival photos and supporting documents about pre-1940 General Grant National Park. Several of the photos are currently featured in the new Kings Canyon Visitor Center film.

Kings Canyon Visitor Center Discovery Room
Hands-On Activity Stations

A recent donation by Sequoia Parks Foundation made possible the completion of the Children’s Discovery Room at the Kings Canyon Visitor Center. This room, which was funded by a grant award from the Coca Cola Foundation, features powerful murals that detail the environments of Kings Canyon National Park. Now, with the help of the Foundation, these murals are supported by activity carts that inspire school groups to explore the murals and their messages.